Announcements

Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle 
What: "Slavery by Another Name" – Film Screenings

When:  February 4 & 11 @ 2:30 pm (Dole Institute of Politics)

              February 4 & 18 @ 7:00 pm (Freedom’s Frontier Heritage Area - Carnegie Library)

Where:  Dole Institute of Politics, University of Kansas

                 Freedom’s Frontier Heritage Area - Carnegie Library, Lawrence KS

Cost per person: FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Sponsors of this Event: Langston Hughes Center, National Endowment for the Humanities, Gilder Lerhman Institute of American History, Department of African & African American Studies, Dole Institute of Politics, and Freedom’s Frontier Heritage Area

About: The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Created Equal project uses the power of documentary films to encourage public conversations about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America.
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Jesse B. Semple Brownbag Series

What: “Lest We Forget: An ethnographic journey through Angola State Penitentiary" – Daniel Evan Atkinson, University of Kansas

When:  Monday, February 10 @11:30 am - 1:00 pm (11:30 –12:00 social period and brownbag lunch)

Where:  Langston Hughes Center, Room 1, Bailey Hall (University of Kansas, Lawrence Campus)

Cost per person: FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
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Amiri Baraka

What: “Remembering the Art, Politics, and Legacy of Amiri Baraka" – Tony Bolden, Darren Canady, William H. Harris, and Nicole Hodges Persley, University of Kansas

When: February 18 @ 7:00 pm

Where: Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union, University of Kansas

Cost per person: FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

On November 3, 2009 Amiri Baraka delivered the Marwa Africana Lecture at the University of Kansas.  In honor of the poet, playwright, novelist, music critic, and political activist, the LHC and AAAS are posting the poetry reading portion of the lecture.

Watch the reading

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Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle 

What: "Worse than Slavery: Race, Violence, and the Defining of the Nation in Post-Emancipation America" – Shawn Leigh Alexander, University of Kansas

When:  February 27 @ 7:30 pm

Where: Freedom’s Frontier Heritage Area - Carnegie Library, Lawrence KS

Cost per person: FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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Announcements

Summer African Language Institute

Events

  • ​AAAS Sponsored & Co-Sponsored Events
Student Spotlight


Alyssa Cole
A senior in the African and African-American Studies department, introduces President Obama during his remarks at KU on January 22, 2015.



Paul Fowler

Paul discusses his undergraduate research project on the history of the African-American community in Lawrence, Kansas, with one of his mentors, professor Clarence Lang, associate professor of African and African-American Studies (AAAS). Paul is now a graduate student in AAAS.



Sarah Mitchell

Sarah, a senior majoring in African Studies, spent the spring 2014 semester studying at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. While there, in addition to studying archaeology and cultural anthropology, she travelled throughout Southern Africa, including a trip to Victoria Falls, a trip to Johannesburg and Pretoria, and a spring break volunteer experience at a center for kids with disabilities.

When looking to tackle the issue of obesity in rural America, where should we start? The answer is not what you might think. Empathy, says Christie Befort, an associate professor at KU who has just won a $10 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to investigate solutions to rural obesity. Many physicians are embarrassed talking about weight—especially in a small town where everybody knows each other, Befort says. By providing obesity treatment options in rural primary care, she plans to start a conversation, and maybe a revolution, in rural health care. For more details on Befort's efforts, check out the 2015 Chancellor's Report: http://bit.ly/1D5A5MO and her video: http://bit.ly/1C5xYZa Tags: #KUcommunities #Obesity #Health #Rural #Midwest Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute - PCORI

Whistling the night away. #exploreKU shot by saamanthathomas on insta. http://t.co/JFZcj31X8h
Explore KU: Experience a KU Men's Basketball tradition It’s explosive. It’s dramatic. It’s intimidating. It’s a KU tradition (see more at http://bit.ly/KUtraditions) simply known as the Confetti Toss. But it creates a primal eruption of fan enthusiasm at the opening of every KU men’s basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse. It starts as the visiting team is introduced on court. The KU student section is visibly bored and unimpressed. The entire section under the north basket holds up University Daily Kansans — making the point they’d rather read the newspaper than even look at the other team. They shake and rustle the student newspapers. Then the moment they were waiting for arrives — the Jayhawks enter the court. All Rock Chalk breaks loose. Newspapers, confetti and thousands of thundering voices soar into already charged atmosphere of KU’s hallowed basketball arena. The confetti hits its high point, near the banner on the north wall reading “Pay Heed, All Who Enter: Beware of the Phog.” And the confetti rains back into the stands, onto the court and into the memories of all at hand. It’s time to play.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times